A molecular biologist and his laboratory partner uncover evidence that may fundamentally change society as we know it.

Priya Varma: You know a scientist once asked the Dalai Lama, "What would you do if something scientific disproved your religious beliefs?" And he said, after much thought, "I would look at all the papers. I'd take a look at all the research and really try to understand things. And in the end, if it was clear that the scientific evidence disproved my spiritual beliefs, I would change my beliefs."
Ian: That's a good answer.
Priya Varma: Ian... what would you do if something spiritual disproved your scientific beliefs?
Sofi: How many senses do worms have?
Ian: They have two. Smell and touch. Why?
Sofi: So... they live without any ability to see or even know about light, right? The notion of light to them is unimaginable.
Ian: Yeah.
Sofi: But we humans... we know that light exists. All around them... right on top of them... they cannot sense it. But with a little mutation, they do. Right?
Ian: Correct.
Sofi: So... Doctor Eye... perhaps some humans, rare humans... have mutated to have another sense. A spirit sense. And can perceive a world that is right on top of us... everywhere. Just like the light on these worms.
Ian: I don't believe in luck. I do believe we've known each other since forever, though.
Sofi: Really?
Ian: Yeah. You know how? When the big bang happened, all the atoms in the universe, they were all smashed together into one little dot that exploded outward. So my atoms and your atoms were certainly together then, and, who knows, probably smashed together several times in the last 13.7 billion years. So my atoms have known your atoms and they've always known your atoms. My atoms have always loved your atoms.
Ian: You ever feel like when you met someone, they fill this hole inside of you, and then when they're gone... you feel that space painfully vacant?
Sofi: Do you know the story of the Phasianidae?
Ian: The... No, what's that?
Sofi: It's a bird that experiences all of time in one instant. And she sings the song of love and anger and fear and joy and sadness all at once. And this bird... when she meets the love of her life... is both happy and sad. Happy because she sees that for him it is the beginning, and sad because she knows it is already over.
Sofi: Why are you working so hard to disprove God?
Ian: Disprove? Who proved that God was there in the first place?
Ian: It's a false positive, you understand? It's an error. It has to be an error. It's statistically impossible. Data point.
Karen: If I drop this phone a thousand times, a million times... and one time, it does't fall... just once, it hovers in the air. That is an error that's worth looking at.
Ian: I'd like to tell you the story of the eyes that changed my world.
Sofi: When I saw you that night, I... I had the feeling that I had known you. Actually, I felt like you knew me.
Ian: What do you mean?
Sofi: Like we are connected from past lives.
Ian: I don't believe in that.
Sofi: What do you believe in?
Ian: I'm a scientist. I believe in data.
Ian: I do believe we've known each other since forever.
Sofi: Really?
Ian: Yes. You know how? When the Big Bang happened, all the atoms in the universe were all smashed together into one little dot that exploded outward, so my atoms and your atoms were certainly together then and... who knows, probably smashed together several times in the last 13.7 billion years, so my atoms have known your atoms and they've always known your atoms. My atoms have always loved your atoms.
Sofi: You know you have it.
Ian: Have what?
Sofi: But you're scared of it.
Ian: I have what?
Sofi: Okay. You live in this room, right?
Ian: Mm-hmm.
Sofi: Reality. You have a bed, you have books, um, a desk, a chair, lamps. Logic. But in this room, you have a door... to the other side. See? Light comes through. It's open just a tiny bit, but it is open. You keep trying to close that door because you're scared. But you won't always be scared.
Ian: What's behind the door? Besides my dirty laundry.
Sofi: You have to go in to find out. You know what I'm talking about.
Ian: I have no idea.
Sofi: You will.
Ian: Where are you from?
Sofi: Another planet.
Ian: You know we could be looking forever and find nothing.
Karen: Turning over rocks and finding nothing is progress.
Kenny: Are you hitting on the waitress in front of your pregnant wife?
Karen: I don't know if you know this about me, Kenny, but the gene for jealousy? Recessive.
Ian: You live in this fairy, magical... fantasy land. It's a fucking lie, and you know it's a lie.
Ian: There is no proof that there is some magical spirit living above us
Sofi: Why are you working so hard to disprove God?
Ian: What's wrong? I know something's wrong, so...
Sofi: You leave me every day to torture little worms?
[first lines]
Ian: Every living person on this planet has their own unique pair eyes. Each their own universe. My name is Doctor Ian Gray. I'm a father, and husband, and I'm a scientist. When I was a child, I realized that the camera was designed exactly like the human eye, taking in light through a lens, forming it into images. I began taking as many pictures of eyes as I possibly could. I'd like to tell you the story of the eyes that changed my world.
Ian: I'm so looking forward to brainwashing this child with you.
Karen: You know what I was thinking? What if we turn the garage into a lab? And the baby could be our first test subject.
Karen: The man I married, I don't think he would let his own grief, even if it was overwhelming, get in the way of what could potentially be the greatest scientific discovery the world has ever seen.
Ian: Am I going to be stuck with this child the rest of my life?

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